December 4th, 2017

This is the way to enhance your reputation at the bargaining table

Photo: Reputation – bonnel 706D local-business-consulting-894339_1920 at Pixabay

What do you think? Does a reputation for collaboration or for competition suggest an advantage at the bargaining table?  We both know you cannot control what others say about you, but you can control what you do and how you do it. You only have one reputation and once that is tarnished you are in trouble. So what type of reputation should you try to cultivate?

This topic has been heavily researched by academics related to  collaborative negotiations indicating the pro’s and con’s with an emphasis on encouraging this style for good reason.  It works.  It enhances group outcomes and it has the potential to increase the size of the pie. It may also foster longer term relationships. How do we know that competitive negotiations don’t fare as well?  Studies comparing the two approaches bear this out.  Collaborative negotiators are appreciated because they do increase the size of the pie.  They also point out to their team areas where there may be concerns, which can also point towards issue resolution. This is a very important trait to avoid group think from taking over and over confidence by the negotiating team.

With this being the case why aren’t all negotiations collaborative?  We as humans like competition.  We like to win.  Our society instills this from our media to our political leaders that look for blame.  We also like to have good relationships.  Depending on which of these two approaches we feed determines which direction we may go forward according to a Cherokee legend.

In the end a reputation for collaboration is the key.  Michael Gregory, NSA, ASA, CVA, MBA and a Qualified Mediator with the Minnesota Supreme Court is an international speaker that helps others resolve conflict, negotiate winning solutions and inspire leaders.  Mike services clients business to IRS, business to business and within businesses. On point resources are available online at www.mikegreg.com and check out the blog. Mike may be contacted directly at mg@mikegreg.com or at (651) 633-5311. 

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